New Invader – Orange Hawkweed

Orange hawkweed (Hieracium auranticum) has been recently reported in Clatsop County. New to the county, this very aggressive and non-palatable noxious weed can quickly spread into native habitat, lawns, and pastures. Be on the lookout for this showy weed, because if left untreated, it can form dense monocultures that displace other vegetation. Please report sightings to our office and at this link: https://oregoninvasiveshotline.org/. For more information on identification and impact, check out this resource from the Oregon Department of Agriculture: orange hawkweed

Mat-grass

Mat-grass (Nardus stricta) is a non-native bunchgrass that is able to out-compete desired pastured grasses due to its lack of palatability to grazing livestock. It is difficult to locate and eradicate because of its ability to mix in with other grasses. It is a perennial, strongly rooted grass that can send flower spikelets up to eight inches tall. It is not widespread in Oregon, however a population has been identified in Clatsop County, which is being actively managed by Oregon Department of Agriculture and other partners. (http://www.oregon.gov/oda/shared/Documents/Publications/Weeds/MatgrassProfile.pdf, http://www.imapinvasives.org/storymat-grass)

If you suspect that your land contains mat-grass, please contact CSWCD at 503-325-4571.

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Early Detection Rapid Response

Clatsop SWCD is the leading agency for county-wide noxious weed control in Clatsop County. We work with local partners and volunteers to select weed control priorities for our county and strive to promote regional collaboration for efficient control efforts. One of the most effective ways to control the spread of an exotic noxious species or to eradicate the undesired population is Early Detection and Rapid Response.

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a two part process that requires both agencies and local residents to work together.

Step 1) Early Detection
Finding and correctly identifying a problem species in the vast expanse of Clatsop County is the biggest hurdle for noxious weed control efforts. The below species have been identified as species that will cause detrimental effects to our economy, human health, and ecology if allowed to establish in Clatsop County:

Common Reed (Phragmites australis)
False Brome (Brachypodium sylvaticum)
Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)
Old Man’s Beard (Clematis vitalba)
Shiny Geranium (Geranium lucidum)
Spurge Laurel (Daphne laureola)
Yellow Archangel (Lamium galeobdolon)
Lesser Celandine (Runuculus ficaria)
False Indigo (Ammorpha frudicosa)
Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium)
Darwin’s Barberry (Berberis darwinii)
Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster)
Gorse (Ulex europaeus)
Garden Loostrife (Lysimachia vulgaris)
Ludwigia
Yellow Floating Heart (Mymophoides peltata)
Yellowflag iris (iris pseudacorus)

Step 2) Rapid Response
After identifying a potential noxious weed please report it! Using the Oregon Invasives Hotline at oregoninvasiveshotline.org is the best way to report a potential invader. The Oregon Invasives Species Hotline can take reports for all types of potential invaders from terrestrial plants to aquatic animals or insects! For help or questions please contact Clatsop SWCD the Clatsop County local hotline contact 503-325-4571.

 

Early Detection Rapid Response

Clatsop SWCD is the leading agency for county-wide noxious weed control in Clatsop County. We work with local partners and volunteers to select weed control priorities for our county and strive to promote regional collaboration for efficient control efforts. One of the most effective ways to control the spread of an exotic noxious species or to eradicate the undesired population is Early Detection and Rapid Response.

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a two part process that requires both agencies and local residents to work together.

Step 1) Early Detection
Finding and correctly identifying a problem species in the vast expanse of Clatsop County is the biggest hurdle for noxious weed control efforts. The below species have been identified as species that will cause detrimental effects to our economy, human health, and ecology if allowed to establish in Clatsop County:

Common Reed (Phragmites australis)
False Brome (Brachypodium sylvaticum)
Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)
Old Man’s Beard (Clematis vitalba)
Shiny Geranium (Geranium lucidum)
Spurge Laurel (Daphne laureola)
Yellow Archangel (Lamium galeobdolon)
Lesser Celandine (Runuculus ficaria)
False Indigo (Ammorpha frudicosa)
Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium)
Darwin’s Barberry (Berberis darwinii)
Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster)
Gorse (Ulex europaeus)
Garden Loostrife (Lysimachia vulgaris)
Ludwigia
Yellow Floating Heart (Mymophoides peltata)
Yellowflag iris (iris pseudacorus)

Step 2) Rapid Response
After identifying a potential noxious weed please report it! Using the Oregon Invasives Hotline at oregoninvasiveshotline.org is the best way to report a potential invader. The Oregon Invasives Species Hotline can take reports for all types of potential invaders from terrestrial plants to aquatic animals or insects! For help or questions please contact Clatsop SWCD the Clatsop County local hotline contact 503-325-4571.

EDRR Trainings for Field Staff
Local partners National Historical Park : Fort Clatsop, OSU Extension, and Clatsop SWCD recently hosted an Early Detection Rapid Response Training for natural resource professionals working in the field. Thank you to everyone who attended it was a great turn out!
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Yellow-flag iris

Yellow-flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) is an emergent iris that can create dense stands, grow up to 5 feet in height, and create a yellow flower that can bloom April-August.  Impacts of this plant include displacement of desired vegetation in wetlands, shorelines, ponds and streambanks, disruption of water irrigation systems, and cause gastroenteritis in cattle. Impacts to humans include minor skin irritation from sap and gastric distress if plant parts are ingested.  Reproduction and dispersal is achieved by persistent rhizomes and seed dispersal that are able to survive periods of drought.

Clatsop SWCD has funding to treat yellow-flag iris throughout Youngs Bay Watershed and the Clatsop Plains Region.  If you see this plant, call 503-325-4571 as soon as possible.

Other Clatsop SWCD weed control projects for 2013 include knotweed control, purple loostrife control, purple loostrife bio-control, survey and treatment of non-native phragmites, and gorse removal.  For more information, to report a weed, and to request treatment (FREE OF CHARGE) call 503-325-4571 or email clatsopswcd@iinet.com.

Yellow-flag iris seed pods found in Youngs Bay Watershed

Clematis vitalba

Old Man’s Beard (clematis vitalba) also known as Evergreen clematis can be found on roadsides, riverbanks, gardens, disturbed forests, and forest edges. This woody vine aggressively overtakes trees and can be potentially toxic to livestock. Plants bloom in summer, producing small, greenish white flowers that are found in clusters, though seed heads remain visible in winter. Clatsop SWCD has a treatment program for this noxious weed for summer 2014. For more information or to report this weed call 503-325-4571

Shiny Geranium

Shiny Geranium is a shade-tolerant ground cover plant that can displace forest understory vegetation.  This plant can be identified by red stems grow from a weak central root and pink 5-petaled flowers that bloom April-May.  Reproductive seed material is small and can be transported on boots, vehicles, and wildlife.  Most effective control of this weed is herbicide application, though in small infestations manual pulling of the plant has been successful if treated before flower bloom.  Contact Clatsop SWCD if you see this plant!

 

English Ivy

English Ivy (Hedera helix) is an evergreen vine that is extremely well adapted to Pacific Northwest climate.  This aggressively spreading vine can spread over hillsides, trees, man-made structures, and has no biological control.  English Ivy can displace native vegetation, cause structural damage to man-made structures, and inhibit healthy growth of trees.

English ivy spreads vegetatiavely through long vines that root at the nodes, but can also spread through berries.  Manual removal of English ivy vines and roots is the most common and most effective method of control.  After ivy is removed, cover the area with desired vegetation and mulch to decrease the likelihood of ivy re-establishment.

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed can be found in abundance in and around Clatsop County.

 

 
 

Scientific name: Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) Ronse Decr.

Synonym: Polygonum cuspidatum Siebold & Zucc.

Common names: Japanese knotweed, fleeceflower, Mexican bamboo, huzhang

 

 

(from KingCounty.gov...)

Japanese knotweed is often confused with its hybrid Bohemian knotweed and the closely related giant knotweed. It is a robust, bamboo-like perennial that spreads by long creeping rhizomes to form dense thickets. Originally imported as an ornamental screen or hedge plant, Japanese knotweed is native to Asia. In North America, this plant is not held in check by natural enemies and is capable of thriving and spreading in a wide range of conditions, especially riverbanks, roadsides and other moist, disturbed areas. Containment and control of all the invasive knotweeds is highly challenging but very important in order to protect uninfested areas from the damage caused by this group of plants.